#361MC // Final Major Project: ‘Femme’ Day 1 Reflection

‘Femme’ has changed so much from the first initial idea of wanting to showcase in an  exhibition, to an interactive website and finally to a documentary. It’s come a long way with many hiccups and tough decisions but after day one of filming I’m feeling positive with it’s final outcome.

The day started late at 3:30pm with 3 interviews every hour – I spaced them out this way as I wasn’t sure how long each interviewee would need to answer ten questions on body image in social media – turns out each interview only lasted 5-10 minutes which was a blessing for my equipment recording space.

Being someone completely new to filming my own interviews was a gold mine for my anxiety and during the set up, which took an hour, I kept having to remind myself I could handle the situation. When the first interviewee appeared I felt more nervous than they did but after the first couple of questions I soon began to feel comfortable talking to each person about their experiences and opinions and was able to have a conversation that flowed quite nicely.

I used the Dedo lights to create a 3-point set up on the subject as I was working with white walls and needed to create some background interest, using the LED panel as well to bounce light into the subjects eyes off the ceiling created a beautiful ring light giving life to each person which I was super pleased with. My final day of shooting is Monday 24th April with the same set up and two camera perspective – overall the day went smoothly minus the H5 Zoom cutting out and not recording every so often which meant I opted at loaning the H6 Zoom instead for Monday’s shoot. Hopefully the second day will go just as well as the first with another 4 interviews, including myself.

#364MC // Professional Experience // Tutorial Documentation Form

364MC Tutorial Preparation Document

1.   Do you have a specific career in mind? If yes, what career?

If yes, what career? If no, what kind of careers are you considering?

 

Yes, the career I’d like to pursue would be that of Cinematography/DOP or Sound Assistant

 

 

 

2.   What research have you already carried out about this career?

List websites, books, primary research etc. and what you have found out.

 

 

I’ve been emailing lots of professional DOP’s and Cinematographers, yet to hear responses, but from what I’ve researched it’s something you have to practice very well and volunteer to help shoot films, get your portfolio large enough for people to notice you. Also have an eye for detail and an imagination for creative shots.

 

 

 

3.   How will your FMP further your career aims?
 

My FMP is somewhat experimental; I want to have an exhibition over documentary and short. I want to address social media and body image in my exhibition with video pieces and some photography images. I got inspired at the Tate when I saw a piece by Marvin Gaye Chetwood where they placed multiple TV screens showcasing human bodies in a carnivalesque performance based on a TV detective program. I believe it will further my career as it’s different to short film and documentary and explores more than just one medium with photography in there was well.

 

 

 

 

4.   Have you considered carrying out any work experience/placements during the year? If yes, what have you considered and how far down the line are you in arranging it?
 

I would love the opportunity to gain some more experience as I’ve not been able to gain any recently but unfortunately that hasn’t happened yet.

 

 

 

5. Are you on the Media Production Professional Experience Facebook space?
I am not and I can’t seem to find the page to join.

 

 

6. Have you registered with Creative Futures? If not, you must do it immediately.
 

Yes I have

 

7. Have you registered with Central Careers in the Hub?
I believe so

 

8. Have you had a one-to-one with them to discuss career options?
Not yet but will be planning to do so next week.

 

9. What portfolios have you seen/looked at and what techniques have you started to consider for your own portfolio? Provide URLs

 

I’ve looked at examples online and professional portfolios on professional cinematographer websites to consider in my own portfolio.

 

 

 

10. What professionals have you isolated as being useful for you to contact?

Provide name, role, organization and why they will be useful to you

 

I haven’t isolated any right now; I’ve just been emailing multiple contacts in hope of a reply.

 

 

 

 

 

11. What networks have you isolated as being useful for you to further your career? Provide URLs, when and where they meet/how they are accessed (if virtual networks) etc.

 

 

https://www.linkedin.com/

 

 

 

#364MC // Professional Experience // Research & Development // Camera Assistant #2

In my previous post about camera assistant research I concentrated on the roles available in this day and age, the requirements and how to gain experience and access to those opportunities.

Whilst doing that I came across a couple of freelance Videographers and their online portfolios showcasing their business and skills and decided it was worth documenting as this is something that would help me when creating my own portfolio. Below I’ve included some screenshots of the few that I came across and found appealing:

One of the first videographers I came across was Charlotte Armitage at charlottearmitage.com

I loved Charlotte’s website it was clean cut, and modern. The moving image behind each page (Portfolio, Contact etc) was very relevant and the shots were beautiful. She has a vast portfolio of experience without over loading the client with information – everything is laid out clearly. The contact page is also thorough with information or her details and how to contact her for bookings which is, obviously, essential when you’re a freelancer.

Screen Shot 2017-04-05 at 23.20.09

The next freelancer I came across was Jon Collins at ukjoncollins.com. I wasn’t as much of a fan of his website as I was of Charlotte’s – I found it a little over whelming and the colour scheme was quite intense. However, it reminded me a lot of one of my favourite films ‘Trainspotting’ with the muted black and orange theme. Minus the colours, the wait it is laid out is simple enough with all relevent information at the top.

Screen Shot 2017-04-05 at 23.20.56Screen Shot 2017-04-05 at 23.21.12

Lastly I came across freelancer Tom Farmery at tomfarmery.co.uk – I was really drawn to this theme. It felt modern and clean yet was detailed enough that it didn’t look too clinical and provided all the information a client would need. One of the things I noticed everytime I clicked onto a different persons website, they all had a distinct logo or branding for their company. Much like my own I feel like the logo has to be distinguishable to a certain extent without being confused by another logo.

WEBSITES:

https://www.tomfarmery.co.uk/

http://charlottearmitage.com/

http://ukjoncollins.com/

#364MC // Professional Experience // Research & Development // Camera Op

Ever since studying Media I have always loved the visuals, which might be something everyone would say as it’s the thing we see first. What camera angles are being used to display an emotion, event etc. For almost every university project I have been camera assistant or Director of Photography. My inspiration stemmed from Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch – two people who have influenced my work and what I want to portray through film ever since I started studying film.

I will always remember Kubrick’s ‘One Point Perspective’ which I’ve tried to embody in some of my own work. Below is an example of his technique:


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/48425421″>Kubrick // One-Point Perspective</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/kogonada”>kogonada</a&gt; on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Whilst researching into the role of a camera assistant I came across a book titled ‘The Camera Assistant’s Manual’ by David E. Elkins (1991) within the first pages I discovered some of the history behind the technology used before camera’s became more complex and required individuals to learn this skill “The process of motion picture photography started when George Eastman introduced the first 35 mm film in 1889, and Thomas Edison, along with his assistant W. K. L. Dickson, designed the Kinetograph and Kinetoscope, also around 1889. Various reports indicate that the patent was applied for in 1891 but that it wasn’t granted until 1897. The Kinetograph was used to photograph motion pictures, and the Kinetoscope was used to view them. These early pieces of equipment were very basic in their design and use. As film cameras became more complex, a need developed for specially trained individuals to work with this new technology and equipment. Two of these individuals became known as the First Assistant Cameraman (1st AC) and the Second Assistant Cameraman (2nd AC).” Billy Blitzer, one of the first well known cinematographers who worked alongside Director D. W. Griffith was assigned what they would call back then, a Camera Boy, which is today’s Camera Assistant role – to simply carry the equipment and make a note of the shots for the day as there was no Script Supervisor back in 1914.

When you start looking for that first professional job, any experience, even if it is on a student production, increases your chance of getting a job. ” It is true that getting experience on a film set whether that being a student production or a professional production it will increase the chances of landing the job in media which you desire. I found that my opportunity on a real film-set came from working with individuals who had made connections doing the same routine – working on student projects, contacting professionals and then landing experience even if it is volunteer work. There’s something very humbling and more rewarding when working on a set you have volunteered for – I found myself working extra hard to prove my worth of being there whilst on the set of ‘Sustain’.

With this in mind I decided to do a little research on how to go about applying for a role as Camera Assistant:

  • have good colour vision, and good hand-to-eye co-ordination
  • have a working knowledge of how the relevant camera equipment works
  • have good communication skills and show diplomacy and sensitivity when working with artists, production staff and crew
  • be able to take direction and work as part of a team
  • be able to carry out instructions with great accuracy and attention to detail
  • be able to work under pressure and in stressful situations
  • be able to frame and compose shots after you’ve gained some experience
  • have good IT skills
  • possess physical stamina for working long hours and moving heavy equipment
  • understand the requirements of the relevant health and safety legislation and procedures

Intensive industry experience is the best route into this role, having gained a grounding in the basic camera skills and knowledge required. You could begin your career as a Camera Assistant, and then work your way up through the ranks of the camera department over several years.

When searching for job vacancies a lot of free-lance work was cropping up over the place as well as trainee jobs – which is inspiring to see as most people would assume media jobs are sparse. Just by searching ‘camera assistant’ into a job search website like Indeed.co.uk pages and pages of jobs were displayed under that same criteria.

References

“Camera Assistant (Studio And Outside Broadcast)”. Creativeskillset.org. N.p., 2017. Web. 5 Apr. 2017.

Elkins, David E. The Camera Assistant’s Manual. New York: Focal Press, 2013. Print.